An Inclusive Web (for developers)

The Web has evolved at an unbelievable pace. We've come a long way from the Geocities-hosted personal homepages with guestbook and counter scripts hacked together by aspiring webmasters. Now, the Web is filled full scale applications and platforms built by teams of highly skilled software engineers to serve a multitude of business needs. It's an incredible amount of progress in a very short period of time.

However, in that frenetic pace, I feel like we're losing something: the accessibility for anyone to build for the Web.

When we talk about accessibility, we focus on the users of the Web and their ability to access and interact with information online. This is an extremely important and ongoing process. As Web professionals, we should all work towards building and maintaining a Web ecosystem that is inclusive to everyone, no matter their circumstance.

But as Web professionals, we should also be working to ensure that the Web is inclusive to anyone who wants to design and/or develop for the Web. We should be welcoming and open to anyone who shows interest in building something online whether they are a seasoned computer programmer transitioning to Javascript or someone who has discovered a browser inspector for the first time and wants to learn more about CSS.

The Web is a vast place with room for things as small as a personal site to experiment with and learn to enterprise-level applications serving millions of customers. Everyone should have the opportunity to find their place on the Web and be given the ability to contribute to it.

Exclusion only serves to hinder the Web. But just as designing and developing inclusively for users with disabilities helps to create better experiences for all users, being inclusive to everyone who wants to develop for the Web will help to create better developers out of all of us.